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The official Dram Association review of

EH Taylor - Small Batch Bottled In Bond

"Pantry Raid"

The official Dram Association review of

EH Taylor - Small Batch Bottled In Bond

"Pantry Raid"

Dram Code: E56
Producer: Buffalo Trace
Bottler: Official Bottling
Region: The USA

Whisky Type: Bourbon
Cask Type: Virgin American Oak Barrel
Age: 4
ABV: 50%

Release: Small Batch
Price: $108.61 (at time of review)

Dram Code: E56
Producer: Buffalo Trace
Bottler: Official Bottling
Region: The USA
Whisky Type: Bourbon
Cask Type: Virgin American Oak Barrel
Age: 4
ABV: 50%
Release: Small Batch
Price: $108.61 (at time of review)

88.05/100

Flavour Profile:
Fruity & Spicy

Visual: 4.57 /5
Aroma: 21.81 /25

Taste: 35.38 /40
Finish: 26.29 /30

88.05/100

Flavour Profile: Fruity & Spicy

Visual: 4.57 /5 Aroma: 21.81 /25
Taste: 35.38 /40 Finish: 26.29 /30

About This Dram

The “Summer Of Blends” continues here in the Dram Association, with a look at how our neighbours to the south like to blend their whisky.

In the world of hard-to-find, collectible, high-quality bourbons – there’s really only one name at the top. Buffalo Trace is the makers of Weller’s, Blanton’s, Stagg, Pappy Van Winkle… the list goes on and on. These bourbons can cost thousands of dollars on the secondary market and are highly sought after. But there’s one brand that consistently offers the best value for money in the eyes of many, and that’s EH Taylor. This whisky has won more international awards than you can shake a stave at, and it’s now getting harder and harder to find. Here in BC, it’s practically gold dust – so when I was offered the only two cases coming to private stores on the island, I jumped at the opportunity to share it with our members. I hope that you enjoy it!

Located in Frankfort Kentucky, this powerhouse of a distillery produces around ten million litres of whiskey a year. They lay claim to being the oldest continuously operating distillery in the states – but that is contested by Maker’s Mark. Either way, it dates back to 1775 – which incredibly is the same year that the oldest Scotch distillery still producing whisky was founded, Glenturret!

But what exactly are we drinking here? This particular brand is named for Colonel Edmund Haynes Taylor Jr., a key player in the history of bourbon. He started as many as 7 distilleries in Kentucky and was supposedly a lobbyist for the “Bottled In Bond Act” too. I should mention that the term Colonel is an honorary title given in Kentucky to public figures. There’s a certain Colonel Sanders with whom you may also be familiar.

Bourbon is a protected term meaning that it is made in the USA with a mash bill of at least 51% corn and matured in a virgin American oak barrel. There’s a lot of technical specs too, but that’s the most important part. This is also labelled as a “Straight Bourbon”, which adds the stipulations that the spirit is not coloured or flavours, and has been matured for at least two years.

“Bottled In Bond” is a legal term in American whiskey that guarantees a certain higher level of quality by making the whiskey adhere to strict rules. It must only contain spirit distilled in one single distilling season (January to June or July to December), so no blending of older and younger stock together. It must be bottled at exactly 50% abv, and be at least four years aged in oak. Finally, the bottle must identify the distillery it was distilled at and it must have been matured in a government bonded warehouse. It may seem like a lot of rules, but in a country where you can legally mature a whiskey for only 5 seconds, it’s good to have some legally binding standards. And yes, there is a 5-second aged whiskey – it’s made by Pabst Blue Ribbon of all people! Buyer beware.

The last part of the puzzle here is “Small Batch”. While there are no legal protections for the term in the USA, it is common practice to use between 10 and 20 barrels in a small batch whiskey. This means there is a somewhat high chance of flavour variation throughout the years, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it’s a model now being used across the pond with products like Aberlour A’bunadh and Monkey Shoulder.

 

Tasting Notes

Red apples greeted us first on the nose, and from there we dove straight into the pantry with dried banana chips, dark chocolate, dried apricots, and blueberry muffins.

On the palate, we had brown sugar, orange peel, toasted oats, nutmeg, licorice, honey nut cheerios, and oak. The finish was back where we started with the apples, but with a luxurious caramel coating.

by | Aug 10, 2019

Recent Dram Association Reviews

Read all about these whiskies, including Adam's notes and the official Dram Association group score!

How We Review Whiskies

Score

Whiskies are rated by our members on the visuals (out of 5), aroma (out of 25), taste (out of 40), & finish (out of 30). With a total score out of 100.

Based on how scoring occurred for our early reviews, the following guide is given to members -

0-60 awful • 60-70 bad • 70-80 okay • 80-85 good • 85-90 great • 90-95 awesome • 95+ amazing

The individual scores are collected, and outliers are removed via the "agreeable group" statistical method to reduce bias and taste preferences (ie, people who score a peated whisky lowly because they don't like peat). This gives us a better idea of the overall quality of the whisky in the eyes of our members.

 

Flavour Profile

Along with scoring the whisky, members are invited to choose up to three of the below flavour profiles which they think match the whisky. The profile that is most commonly chosen is then the official flavour profile for the dram.

fresh & floral
eg - blossoms, cut grass, apples, pears

fruity & spicy
eg - peach, vanilla, coconut, nutmeg

malty & dry
eg - breakfast cereal, nuts, cookies

rich & round
eg - raisins, figs, oak tannins, dates

smoky & earthy
eg - wood smoke, bacon, iodine

 

Dram Association Nickname

The nickname is usually given by the writer of the initial review and tasting notes. It is based on their tasting notes and used to refer to the whisky to keep its true identity hidden for those who enjoy blind tasting.