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The official Dram Association review of

Forty Creek - Unity

"Intermingled Intrigue"

The official Dram Association review of

Forty Creek - Unity

"Intermingled Intrigue"

Dram Code: E55
Producer: Forty Creek
Bottler: Official Bottling
Region: Canada

Whisky Type: Canadian Whisky
Cask Type: Unknown
Age: Not Stated
ABV: 43%

Release: Limited Edition
Price: $84.26 (at time of review)

Dram Code: E55
Producer: Forty Creek
Bottler: Official Bottling
Region: Canada
Whisky Type: Canadian Whisky
Cask Type: Unknown
Age: Not Stated
ABV: 43%
Release: Limited Edition
Price: $84.26 (at time of review)

86.77/100

Flavour Profile:
Fruity & Spicy

Visual: 4.45 /5
Aroma: 21.68 /25

Taste: 35.18 /40
Finish: 25.25 /30

86.77/100

Flavour Profile: Fruity & Spicy

Visual: 4.45 /5 Aroma: 21.68 /25
Taste: 35.18 /40 Finish: 25.25 /30

About This Dram

As you probably know by now, we’re in the middle of our three-month-long celebration of blending. Having tried a single malt that blends many casks together with the Octomore 08.2, and then Douglas Laing’s “With a Twist”, a special blend of malts from every region in Scotland – it’s time to try something a little closer to home. It is launching the day before Canada after all!

Traditional Canadian whisky is all about blending, and here in Canada we do things a little different from the Scots or even the Americans. Canadian whisky is typically a mix of several grains, which are distilled separately and then blended together afterwards. Usually, the base whisky is a corn distillate and then other “flavouring whiskies” are added to create a harmonious profile, usually rye, wheat and barley. In this case, those flavouring whiskies were chosen by five lucky Forty Creek fans, under the watchful eye of master blender  Bill Ashburn. This custom blend of flavouring whiskies was vatted together in “high mocha stave” casks for a while before being carefully blended with a 10-year-old corn base.

There’s one other trick that Canadian whisky has up its sleeves however – the 9.09% rule. This rule allows, blenders to add up to 9.09% (up to an eleventh) “non-whisky” to your whisky and still call it whisky. Now before we get too outraged with this obscure rule – there are restrictions. The additive must be “… any spirit or wine, domestic or imported…”, plus if it’s a spirit, it must be aged in oak for at least two years. So definitely no adding of neutral grain spirit (I’m looking at you America and India…). In this case, we have a wine added to the Forty Creek Unity. However, not just any wine – but a 15-year-old port-style wine. That should add an interesting dimension!

 

Tasting Notes

Earthy, spiced caramel on the nose. Almost like a herbal remedy that’s been infused into candy to trick a kid into eating it. Smells great, though – I’d be tricked for sure!

The palate revealed the port’s influence right away with a blackcurrant jam flavour – or maybe more like welches grape juice. There’s a touch of apples and plentiful rye spice. A little drier than the nose would suggest, but still on the sweeter side. The caramel became creamy, and more like fudge.

by | Jun 30, 2019

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How We Review Whiskies

Score

Whiskies are rated by our members on the visuals (out of 5), aroma (out of 25), taste (out of 40), & finish (out of 30). With a total score out of 100.

Based on how scoring occurred for our early reviews, the following guide is given to members -

0-60 awful • 60-70 bad • 70-80 okay • 80-85 good • 85-90 great • 90-95 awesome • 95+ amazing

The individual scores are collected, and outliers are removed via the "agreeable group" statistical method to reduce bias and taste preferences (ie, people who score a peated whisky lowly because they don't like peat). This gives us a better idea of the overall quality of the whisky in the eyes of our members.

 

Flavour Profile

Along with scoring the whisky, members are invited to choose up to three of the below flavour profiles which they think match the whisky. The profile that is most commonly chosen is then the official flavour profile for the dram.

fresh & floral
eg - blossoms, cut grass, apples, pears

fruity & spicy
eg - peach, vanilla, coconut, nutmeg

malty & dry
eg - breakfast cereal, nuts, cookies

rich & round
eg - raisins, figs, oak tannins, dates

smoky & earthy
eg - wood smoke, bacon, iodine

 

Dram Association Nickname

The nickname is usually given by the writer of the initial review and tasting notes. It is based on their tasting notes and used to refer to the whisky to keep its true identity hidden for those who enjoy blind tasting.