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The official Dram Association review of

Tullibardine - Old Malt Cask 21 Year

"Many Ways To Skin An Apple"

The official Dram Association review of

Tullibardine - Old Malt Cask 21 Year

"Many Ways To Skin An Apple"

Dram Code: E60
Producer: Tullibardine
Bottler: Hunter Laing
Region: The Highlands

Whisky Type: Single Malt
Cask Type: Ex-Sherry Butt
Age: 21
ABV: 50%

Release: Single Cask - 1 of 302
Price: $260.78 (at time of review)

Dram Code: E60
Producer: Tullibardine
Bottler: Hunter Laing
Region: The Highlands
Whisky Type: Single Malt
Cask Type: Ex-Sherry Butt
Age: 21
ABV: 50%
Release: Single Cask - 1 of 302
Price: $260.78 (at time of review)

89.86/100

Flavour Profile:
Fruity & Spicy

Visual: 4.41 /5
Aroma: 22.00 /25

Taste: 35.86 /40
Finish: 27.59 /30

89.86/100

Flavour Profile: Fruity & Spicy

Visual: 4.41 /5 Aroma: 22.00 /25
Taste: 35.86 /40 Finish: 27.59 /30

About This Dram

After three months of exploring blending, it’s time to rediscover the exact opposite style of whisky. Unlike most blends or single malts (which blend multiple casks from the same distillery), single casks value individuality and uniqueness over consistency. You can often find single casks that taste nothing really like their official bottling counterpart. For example a completely unpeated Ardmore, or maybe a particularity unfruity Ardbeg. These rare finds can be absolutely fantastic, however, another outcome of a single cask is quite the opposite. On occasion, we get a single cask from a distillery that is an exquisite example of their quintessential flavour profile. That’s what’s happened on this occasion, with Hunter Laing perfectly capturing the essence of Tullibardine’s rich highland fruit and spice. If you’ve never had an older expression of Tullibardine then this is a great place to start. Although some of you have definitely tried this exact expression before at the OMC2018 release tasting almost two years ago! Since then the Dram Association has quadrupled in size – so let’s see how everybody else likes it.

 

Tasting Notes

The initial aroma was of rich fruity sweetness with a deep malty base. A great structure for a whisky. Rhubarb and custard candies, blueberry yoghurt, apple skins, peanut butter, grilled pears, nutmeg, apricot and Japanese roasted barley tea.

The fruit became stewed on the palate, with skin on German-style spiced applesauce, grilled lemons, digestive biscuits, and finally a rich apple and raisin chutney.

by | Sep 8, 2019

Recent Dram Association Reviews

Read all about these whiskies, including Adam's notes and the official Dram Association group score!

How We Review Whiskies

Score

Whiskies are rated by our members on the visuals (out of 5), aroma (out of 25), taste (out of 40), & finish (out of 30). With a total score out of 100.

Based on how scoring occurred for our early reviews, the following guide is given to members -

0-60 awful • 60-70 bad • 70-80 okay • 80-85 good • 85-90 great • 90-95 awesome • 95+ amazing

The individual scores are collected, and outliers are removed via the "agreeable group" statistical method to reduce bias and taste preferences (ie, people who score a peated whisky lowly because they don't like peat). This gives us a better idea of the overall quality of the whisky in the eyes of our members.

 

Flavour Profile

Along with scoring the whisky, members are invited to choose up to three of the below flavour profiles which they think match the whisky. The profile that is most commonly chosen is then the official flavour profile for the dram.

fresh & floral
eg - blossoms, cut grass, apples, pears

fruity & spicy
eg - peach, vanilla, coconut, nutmeg

malty & dry
eg - breakfast cereal, nuts, cookies

rich & round
eg - raisins, figs, oak tannins, dates

smoky & earthy
eg - wood smoke, bacon, iodine

 

Dram Association Nickname

The nickname is usually given by the writer of the initial review and tasting notes. It is based on their tasting notes and used to refer to the whisky to keep its true identity hidden for those who enjoy blind tasting.